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The “Aleinu”

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The Special Prayer called “Aleinu”.

 

There is a special prayer in the Siddur called the “Aleinu” which means, “it is our duty”.  It is actually one of the very oldest prayers and is found at the conclusion of every prayer service.  Early sources say the “Aleinu”, as a dedication of faith, was actually composed by Joshua after he led Israel across the Jordan into the Promised Land.  Eventually the prayer became part of the daily service.  It was said, that this prayer pointed to the Oneness of God and His kingship, and expressed the belief that all humanity would accept Him as the only God.

The “Aleinu” contains excerpts from Isaiah 30 and Isaiah 45 in which it says, “There is no other God besides me, a just God and a Savior;  …that to me every knee will bow and every tongue will swear about me that only in Adonai are justice and strength”.  The “Aleinu” further speaks of the conviction that He will one day remove detestable idolatry from the earth.

It is significant that this prayer is part of the letter to the Philippians.  Philippians 2:10 tells us, “that in honor of the name given Yeshua, every knee will bow in heaven, on earth and under the earth – every tongue will acknowledge that Yeshua the Messiah is Lord”.  The “Aleinu” would have been quite familiar to a first century Jewish audience and it would have been obvious that Rav Sha’ul (Paul) was quoting from this prayer.

The “Aleinu” was also a favorite prayer of the Jewish martyrs.  In fact, those martyrs, during the Middle Ages, made use of the “Aleinu” as their dying song.   During the persecution of Jews in Blois, France, in 1171 CE they were accused of murdering a Christian child during Passover.  As a result many masters of the Torah were massacred at this time.  The death of these saints was accompanied by a solemn song resounding thru the stillness of the night causing those who heard to wonder at the melodious strains, which they had never heard.  It was ascertained afterwards that the martyred saints had made use of the “Aleinu”.

One eyewitness account sent to Rabbi Jacob of Orleans, read in part:

"When the flames blazed and licked the bodies of the victims, they raised their voices in a unison melody; at first it was a low chant and afterwards a high-sounding melody. The people [Gentiles] came and said: 'Which of your songs is this? For we have never heard such a melody from you before.' Yet we knew it very well, for it was the chant of the Aleinu."

So what was Rav Sha’ul (Paul) communicating to his “Gentile” audience about the Messiah?  The pre-existence of the Messiah was a familiar concept in rabbinic Judaism and so Paul was not drawing on Christian themes but on ancient Hebrew understanding.  From a Hebrew perspective, this prayer looked to the unity of mankind under the Kingship of God.  It was a firm proclamation of the Divine Unity of God.  Yeshua, who was the ultimate Jewish martyr, died for the sins of all mankind in order to bring that unity and restoration, and the fulfillment of God as the supreme King of the Universe.

Consider adding this special prayer to your daily prayer time.  One of the benefits of this prayer was to reveal the difference between Israel’s relationship with God and the view of God the surrounding nation’s exhibited.  Let us answer the call to be set apart.

Marriage in Israel – Full Video Teaching

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Dr. Diana Dye looks at the wedding from a broader perspective.

Not only does she examine the two stages of marriage, but she also looks at the wedding week through the celebration of all of Israel’s festivals.

She further goes on to explain how all the covenants relate to the marriage in some way.

Dr. Dye also examines the various symbols such as the Tefillin and the Tallit as elements in the wedding.

 

 

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Hezekiah and the Messiah – Full Video Teaching

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Dr. Diana Dye looks at the life and story of Hezekiah.  The rabbis associate Hezekiah with the Messiah and Sennacherib as Gog and Magog.  She examines key figures, problems with dating, and prophetic symbolism. She further explores the relationship between Yeshua and Hezekiah by looking at the purpose and importance of redemption.

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The Beatitudes In Genesis – Full Video Teaching

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Diana examines the beatitudes from the perspective of Psalms 145-150.

She also explains how the "Ashrei" or "happy is the man" actually goes back to the very first word in the Bible.

She discusses how this idea of being happy or blessed finds its context in the House of God.

 

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The Heart of the Matter

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nabals-heartThe Bible is clear, "Whoever says "fool" incurs the penalty of burning in the fire of Gei Hinnom." Why such strong words about the fool and what does this really mean? In our culture a fool simply connotes someone who acts unwisely or is silly. But, what was the ancient view of the "fool"? The rich imagery and symbolism in the story of Abigail and Nabal in First Samuel 25 might help explain the real meaning behind the Biblical view of the fool.

This particular story is filled with a variety of images and patterns related to the redemption. First, the heart of Nabal relates to the stages of redemption found in the Festivals of Passover and Rosh HaShanah. Next, the heart of the "fool" has to do with the condition of the human heart and the judgment of God. Lastly, the story points to Abigail as a type of the Holy Spirit, David as a picture of the Messiah and Nabal as a foreshadowing of those sealed to eternal judgment because of the wickedness of their hearts.

The Hebrew word for "fool" is Nabal, but it can also mean to fade away or to wear out; it can also refer to the idea of the flowing away of life. Nabal was a wealthy and prosperous man who owned three thousand sheep and one thousand goats. But he is further described as a cruel and mean man in his deeds. His actions are a reflection of the condition of his heart. James 1:9-11 expresses the idea of the rich man who will "fade away" by his actions. The word "fade away" is also "Nabal" in Hebrew.

Nabal was from the clan of "Kalev" (Caleb) meaning, "like his heart" or the "whole heart." Therefore the word "Kalev" seems to indicate a correlation between the fool, Nabal, and the condition of his heart.

Psalm 14:1, 2 says, "The fool says in his heart, "There is no God." They deal corruptly, their deeds are vile, and not one does what is right."

The name Abigail denotes "my father redeems" or "my father restores one to his original position." Abigail is a picture of the Holy Spirit shining the light of God on the heart to cause an individual to repent. Nabal, the fool, never repents.

Abigail brings gifts of life and sustenance to David and his men. She humbles herself before David and recognizes his sovereignty as ruler over Israel. It is she, as the Spirit, who declares Nabal the "fool" as his name suggests. It is she, as the Spirit, who reveals the wickedness of his heart, because only the Spirit of God can know the true intent of the individual human heart. That's why we call no man "fool". It is she, as the Spirit, who reveals to David that Passover was not the season for vengeance but rather the time for repentance, forgiveness and redemption. The time for the vengeance of God would come between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur.

The story takes place at the time of the sheep shearing festival at Passover. David and his men had protected Nabal's sheep from attack in the wilderness and so in return David asks Nabal for material support. Herdsmen typically receive something for delivering the sheep safely. David sends off greetings of "Shalom" to Nabal who only rejected the protection David provided. Nabal declared he did not even "know" David. David was then ready to destroy Nabal at Passover because he refused to even recognize the authority of God's anointed. A "fool" says in his heart, "There is no God." At the season of Passover, Nabal rejects the offer of redemption.

The story then moves to the time of Rosh HaShanah. Nabal held a feast in his house "like a feast for a king." Rosh HaShanah is the time of the coronation of the king. Nabal's heart was merry within him from drinking wine. But instead of being under the influence of the Holy Spirit, as reflected by his wife Abigail, he places himself under another spirit. In the morning light, an idiom for the Kingdom, his heart died within him. He became as a stone. Then ten days later the Lord struck Nabal and he died. So on Rosh HaShanah he was judged wicked and on Yom Kippur he was sealed in eternal separation from God. The "fool" was sealed in his wickedness by rejecting the arm of salvation at Passover.

In the book of Ezekiel, the prophet reminds all the children of Israel from being made the fool.

"Therefore house of Israel I will judge each of you according to his ways. Repent and turn yourselves away from sin. Make yourselves a new heart and a new spirit; for why should you die house of Israel? I take no pleasure in the death of anyone who dies. I will cleanse you from all your uncleanness. I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit inside you. I will take the stony heart out of your flesh and give you a heart of flesh."

It is clear, being called a "fool" has nothing to do with acting silly but is a choice of the heart and a serious matter of life and death.

Into His Presence

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This is a 4 part series that looks at the facets of the offering service.

We explain the ancient altar ritual of the burnt offering and how this ritual continues today in the Siddur, the Jewish book of prayer. This series does not discuss the Siddur but reveals the ancient customs that surrounded the altar and their deep spiritual meaning.

  • Part 1 - Daily Cycles of Israel
  • Part 2 - Drawing Near to God
  • Part 3 - At the Alter
  • Part 4 - Isaac and the Binding

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Salvation Is Of The Jews – Full Video Teaching

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This teaching is divided into two parts. The first is called Death at the Altar and looks at the elevation offering and its importance in our daily walk. We then examine the burnt offering and connect the offering to Abel and Isaac.

In the second part, called Life at the Well, we will connect the story of Moshe at the well with the seven daughters of Jethro and the Woman at the Well in John 4.


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Mark of the Beast – Full Video Teaching

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Dr. Dye takes a fresh new look at the subject of the mark of the beast. She begins with descriptions of the phylacteries (the tefillin) and the concept of skin infections (tzar’at) and then goes into great details on the letter “vav” which has the value of six.

From there she weaves through the story of Cain and Nimrod and then ties Nimrod to Nebuchadnezzar in the book of Daniel. She also looks at the story of Goliath and finally connects all these elements with the book of Revelation and the number 666.

This is a fascinating study of this symbol.


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Mark of The Beast – Preview Video

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Dr. Dye takes a fresh new look at the subject of the mark of the beast. She begins with descriptions of the phylacteries (the tefillin) and the concept of skin infections (tzar'at) and then goes into great details on the letter "vav" which has the value of six.

From there she weaves through the story of Cain and Nimrod and then ties Nimrod to Nebuchadnezzar in the book of Daniel. She also looks at the story of Goliath and finally connects all these elements with the book of Revelation and the number 666.

This is a fascinating study of this symbol.

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The Voice of the Holy Spirit

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There is nothing like the voice of a mother calling for her children to come home.  A child can always hear her voice no matter the circumstance.  That is because her voice is unique, distinct and imprinted on the soul of every child.  In Judaism the Holy Spirit is that voice, equated with the Shekinah, and the mother aspect of God.  Scholars are recognizing more and more the Holy Spirit as the "female vehicle" for the outpouring of higher teaching and spiritual rebirth.  We recognize the Holy Spirit as the power of God manifested in the world.

All the matriarchs represent the voice of God or the Holy Spirit in some way.  Each has a special message from the heart of the Father to His children.  The name of Rachel is a great example of that.  Rachel’s name in Hebrew is Rach’el. Rach means to follow a prescribed path or regular routine and El means God.  The wind follows a prescribed path each season just as the Spirit follows the path the Father has designed.  Rachel is sometimes even called “Ruach El” by the sages or literally Spirit of God.

Genesis 1:2 describes the “Spirit of God” hovering over the waters.  The word for hovering is “merachfet” which has the same root “rach” from Rachel’s name.  It is the eighteenth word of the Torah and points to the concept of life.  The word “chai”means life and has a value of eighteen in gematria.  The concept of hovering alludes to the shakings of a bird over the nest caring for her young.   The mother bird is giving life to her young by feeding them as well as protecting and defending them.There is also an idiom for hovering, which compares the throne of divine glory hovering over the surface of the waters as a dove hovers over its nest.

The Hebrew word for the Spirit is a feminine nounThe Spirit embodies a variety of feminine qualities and characteristics.  Mother Rachel is described as being intuitive and sensitive.  She is the comforter and the one who determines the peace and tranquility in her home.  She is the bridge to healthy relationships and she is the patient one when her children rebel.  She brings forth fruit that reflects the qualities of love, joy, peace, patience, goodness,kindness and self-control.

“For the fruit of the Spirit is in every kind of goodness, rightness and truth”.

Ephesians 5:9 CJB

So ladies let us make sure this Mother’s Day that our voice in the home is a reflection of the fruit of the Spirit.  Let us strive to manifest and model the good work of the Holy Spirit to those around us who are in our sphere of influence.